At long last, my labor of love is finished! At long last, my labor of love is finished! At long last, my labor of love is finished!

At long last, my labor of love is finished!

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dandelionwineshop:

Red wine… not just for cooking and drinking anymore… IT’S ALSO FOR BAKING! 
A lovely and wildly talented customer changed my life today when she gifted us this beautiful Chocolate Red Wine Cake made with a bottle of our fave Languedoc sipper, Devois de Perret ($13).  It’s seriously the most delicious cake I’ve ever had: moist, rich, dense (but not heavy), with that fresh Grenache-y fruit shining through the dark chocolate.  It’s absolutely the most perfect antidote for the gloom that I can imagine. It’s a total attitude adjuster! I found a recipe that looks promising here if you wanna try it out this weekend!

NYC may be a huge city, but the neighborhoods are just like small towns. One of the great things about my neighborhood is the local wine shop, Dandelion Wine. Everyone that works there is kind and knowledgable and you can always count on a good purchase.I’ve been talking wine and cakes with the owner, Lily, for years now, and recently (finally!) got around to mixing the two for the shop.I forgot to take any pics before I dropped it off, but the shop happened to take a few and write up the super kind post above!
Recipe via Smitten Kitchen dandelionwineshop:

Red wine… not just for cooking and drinking anymore… IT’S ALSO FOR BAKING! 
A lovely and wildly talented customer changed my life today when she gifted us this beautiful Chocolate Red Wine Cake made with a bottle of our fave Languedoc sipper, Devois de Perret ($13).  It’s seriously the most delicious cake I’ve ever had: moist, rich, dense (but not heavy), with that fresh Grenache-y fruit shining through the dark chocolate.  It’s absolutely the most perfect antidote for the gloom that I can imagine. It’s a total attitude adjuster! I found a recipe that looks promising here if you wanna try it out this weekend!

NYC may be a huge city, but the neighborhoods are just like small towns. One of the great things about my neighborhood is the local wine shop, Dandelion Wine. Everyone that works there is kind and knowledgable and you can always count on a good purchase.I’ve been talking wine and cakes with the owner, Lily, for years now, and recently (finally!) got around to mixing the two for the shop.I forgot to take any pics before I dropped it off, but the shop happened to take a few and write up the super kind post above!
Recipe via Smitten Kitchen

dandelionwineshop:

Red wine… not just for cooking and drinking anymore… IT’S ALSO FOR BAKING! 

A lovely and wildly talented customer changed my life today when she gifted us this beautiful Chocolate Red Wine Cake made with a bottle of our fave Languedoc sipper, Devois de Perret ($13).  It’s seriously the most delicious cake I’ve ever had: moist, rich, dense (but not heavy), with that fresh Grenache-y fruit shining through the dark chocolate.  It’s absolutely the most perfect antidote for the gloom that I can imagine. It’s a total attitude adjuster! I found a recipe that looks promising here if you wanna try it out this weekend!

NYC may be a huge city, but the neighborhoods are just like small towns. One of the great things about my neighborhood is the local wine shop, Dandelion Wine. Everyone that works there is kind and knowledgable and you can always count on a good purchase.
I’ve been talking wine and cakes with the owner, Lily, for years now, and recently (finally!) got around to mixing the two for the shop.
I forgot to take any pics before I dropped it off, but the shop happened to take a few and write up the super kind post above!

Recipe via Smitten Kitchen

Wonderful skull cake inspired by Damien Hirst’s For the Love of God, created for Britain’s Art Fund bake sale. Via Slate and ArtFund.org.

Photo by Maja Smend. Courtesy of Art Fund and Slate.

I Want to Live In Your House: Gilsey House

This beautiful behemoth sits at the corner of Broadway and 29th St., its looming facade a reminder of old NYC.

Opened as a luxurious hotel in 1872 catering to guests such as Oscar Wilde and Mark Twain, the Gilsey House was the first hotel in NY to offer telephone service. Its location provided convenient access to the theaters, brothels, and gambling dens that the populated the area formally known as the Tenderloin.

A cursory NYT archive search turned up a snippit about the opening of the hotel as well as a story about "The Hermit of the Gilsey" and "The Murdered Coachman."

After closing in 1911 due to a legal dispuit, the building fell to ruin until it was purchased in 1980 and converted into co-op apartments.

The 4 bedroom, 4.5 bath corner penthouse is currently up for sale with an asking price of $9,497,000.


Maida Heater has a recipe called East 62nd Street Lemon Cake that always makes me think of my maternal grandparents. Not the lemon part, actually, but the East 62nd street bit.

For a short time in the early 1960’s, they lived in an apartment in Manhattan near Bloomingdales. Burt Bacharach and his then wife, Angie Dickinson, were just two of their many neighbors and, as the story goes, my grandfather would ride the elevator up and down, up and down, in hopes of stealing just a minute with Ms. Dickinson and inviting her and Burt over.

Had my grandmother been a baker of any sort, I like to imagine that Maida’s lemon cake would have been the kind she’d have made were Burt and Angie to have stopped by for cake and cocktails (this was the 60’s after all). Alas, I’m pretty sure they never even formally met. 

This past weekend, while browsing my baking books for inspiration to fill my always-on-what-kind-of-winter-is-this-?!-oven, I came across Maida’s lemon cake recipe once again and found myself humming, What the World Needs Now, is Sun, Sweet Sun… 

Sunshine Cake
Adapted from Maida Heater’s East 62nd Street Lemon Cake

3 cups (375 g) all-purpose flour
2 tsp (10 g) baking powder
1/2 tsp (4 g) salt
2 sticks (8 oz., 226 g) unsalted butter, at room temperature
2 cups (400 g) sugar
4 large eggs, at room temperature
1 cup (200 g) sour cream
Zest of two large lemons

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Prepare a 10-cup bundt pan by buttering well or spraying with Pam or Baker’s Joy.

Sift together the flour, baking powder, and salt and set aside. In the bowl of a stand mixer, rub the lemon zest into the sugar to release the oils. Add the softened butter and mix at medium speed until light and fluffy. Add the eggs, one at a time mixing well after each addition. With the mixer on the lowest speed, add the dry ingredients alternately with the sour cream (begin and end with the dry). Mix gently until all is incorporated, then pour the batter into the prepared pan. Bake for 1 hour to 1 hour, 10 minutes until a toothpick or thin knife inserted in the center comes out clean and the cake begins to pull away from the side of the pan. 
While the cake is resting in the pan, juice the two zested lemons and whisk in confectioners sugar to taste. I prefer tart so usually stop at a few tbsp. sugar. 
Invert the cake onto a rack, poke tiny holes all over, and drizzle with the sugary lemon juice. Let the cake cool completely before slicing and serving.
For an added bit of sunshine, sprinkle yellow-gold sanding sugar on top just after the glaze. 
Maida Heater has a recipe called East 62nd Street Lemon Cake that always makes me think of my maternal grandparents. Not the lemon part, actually, but the East 62nd street bit.

For a short time in the early 1960’s, they lived in an apartment in Manhattan near Bloomingdales. Burt Bacharach and his then wife, Angie Dickinson, were just two of their many neighbors and, as the story goes, my grandfather would ride the elevator up and down, up and down, in hopes of stealing just a minute with Ms. Dickinson and inviting her and Burt over.

Had my grandmother been a baker of any sort, I like to imagine that Maida’s lemon cake would have been the kind she’d have made were Burt and Angie to have stopped by for cake and cocktails (this was the 60’s after all). Alas, I’m pretty sure they never even formally met. 

This past weekend, while browsing my baking books for inspiration to fill my always-on-what-kind-of-winter-is-this-?!-oven, I came across Maida’s lemon cake recipe once again and found myself humming, What the World Needs Now, is Sun, Sweet Sun… 

Sunshine Cake
Adapted from Maida Heater’s East 62nd Street Lemon Cake

3 cups (375 g) all-purpose flour
2 tsp (10 g) baking powder
1/2 tsp (4 g) salt
2 sticks (8 oz., 226 g) unsalted butter, at room temperature
2 cups (400 g) sugar
4 large eggs, at room temperature
1 cup (200 g) sour cream
Zest of two large lemons

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Prepare a 10-cup bundt pan by buttering well or spraying with Pam or Baker’s Joy.

Sift together the flour, baking powder, and salt and set aside. In the bowl of a stand mixer, rub the lemon zest into the sugar to release the oils. Add the softened butter and mix at medium speed until light and fluffy. Add the eggs, one at a time mixing well after each addition. With the mixer on the lowest speed, add the dry ingredients alternately with the sour cream (begin and end with the dry). Mix gently until all is incorporated, then pour the batter into the prepared pan. Bake for 1 hour to 1 hour, 10 minutes until a toothpick or thin knife inserted in the center comes out clean and the cake begins to pull away from the side of the pan. 
While the cake is resting in the pan, juice the two zested lemons and whisk in confectioners sugar to taste. I prefer tart so usually stop at a few tbsp. sugar. 
Invert the cake onto a rack, poke tiny holes all over, and drizzle with the sugary lemon juice. Let the cake cool completely before slicing and serving.
For an added bit of sunshine, sprinkle yellow-gold sanding sugar on top just after the glaze.
Maida Heater has a recipe called East 62nd Street Lemon Cake that always makes me think of my maternal grandparents. Not the lemon part, actually, but the East 62nd street bit.
For a short time in the early 1960’s, they lived in an apartment in Manhattan near Bloomingdales. Burt Bacharach and his then wife, Angie Dickinson, were just two of their many neighbors and, as the story goes, my grandfather would ride the elevator up and down, up and down, in hopes of stealing just a minute with Ms. Dickinson and inviting her and Burt over.
Had my grandmother been a baker of any sort, I like to imagine that Maida’s lemon cake would have been the kind she’d have made were Burt and Angie to have stopped by for cake and cocktails (this was the 60’s after all). Alas, I’m pretty sure they never even formally met. 
This past weekend, while browsing my baking books for inspiration to fill my always-on-what-kind-of-winter-is-this-?!-oven, I came across Maida’s lemon cake recipe once again and found myself humming, What the World Needs Now, is Sun, Sweet Sun… 
Sunshine Cake
Adapted from Maida Heater’s East 62nd Street Lemon Cake
3 cups (375 g) all-purpose flour
2 tsp (10 g) baking powder
1/2 tsp (4 g) salt
2 sticks (8 oz., 226 g) unsalted butter, at room temperature
2 cups (400 g) sugar
4 large eggs, at room temperature
1 cup (200 g) sour cream
Zest of two large lemons
Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Prepare a 10-cup bundt pan by buttering well or spraying with Pam or Baker’s Joy.
Sift together the flour, baking powder, and salt and set aside. In the bowl of a stand mixer, rub the lemon zest into the sugar to release the oils. Add the softened butter and mix at medium speed until light and fluffy. Add the eggs, one at a time mixing well after each addition. With the mixer on the lowest speed, add the dry ingredients alternately with the sour cream (begin and end with the dry). Mix gently until all is incorporated, then pour the batter into the prepared pan. Bake for 1 hour to 1 hour, 10 minutes until a toothpick or thin knife inserted in the center comes out clean and the cake begins to pull away from the side of the pan. 
While the cake is resting in the pan, juice the two zested lemons and whisk in confectioners sugar to taste. I prefer tart so usually stop at a few tbsp. sugar. 
Invert the cake onto a rack, poke tiny holes all over, and drizzle with the sugary lemon juice. Let the cake cool completely before slicing and serving.
For an added bit of sunshine, sprinkle yellow-gold sanding sugar on top just after the glaze.
The art of the hard boiled egg The art of the hard boiled egg

The art of the hard boiled egg

Brown Sugar Chocolate Chip layer cake. Recipe from One Bowl Baking.

I’ve loved Megan’s blog, A Sweet Spoonful, for a long time now and have always found her recipes to be well-written and delicious. That said, I am so excited for her new cookbook, Whole Grain Mornings, and can not wait to dive in!

Buttermilk Cake Doughnut Muffins and Coconut “Magic” Bars, both recipes from One Bowl Baking. I’ve also tried the Apple Crisp Bars, Chocolate Wacky Cake, and the Mix-in-a-Mug Chocolate Chip Cookie and they’ve all been brilliant. Though so new, it’s quickly become absolutely one of my favorite baking books—highly recommend! Buttermilk Cake Doughnut Muffins and Coconut “Magic” Bars, both recipes from One Bowl Baking. I’ve also tried the Apple Crisp Bars, Chocolate Wacky Cake, and the Mix-in-a-Mug Chocolate Chip Cookie and they’ve all been brilliant. Though so new, it’s quickly become absolutely one of my favorite baking books—highly recommend!

Buttermilk Cake Doughnut Muffins and Coconut “Magic” Bars, both recipes from One Bowl Baking. I’ve also tried the Apple Crisp Bars, Chocolate Wacky Cake, and the Mix-in-a-Mug Chocolate Chip Cookie and they’ve all been brilliant. Though so new, it’s quickly become absolutely one of my favorite baking books—highly recommend!

Already obsessed with this book, though I just got it a few hours ago. If the recipes work out as I suspect they will, this will be a constant go-to.

Vanilla Birthday Cake with Vanilla Buttercream and Sprinkles

Homemade Peanut Butter Cup. Recipe from blueeyedbakers.com.